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VIDEO: 10k Subscriber Celebration Stream (with Q&A!)

Welcome welcome! We are streaming to you live to answer your questions, tell you about what's new with us, and to celebrate reaching 10,000 subscribers! You all mean the world to us. Thanks for your support and we are so excited for everything to come in 2018."Seven",...

Mental health still losing out in NHS funding, report finds

King’s Fund says physical health services are still getting bigger budgets, five years after ministers promised ‘parity of esteem’

Mental health care providers continue to receive far smaller budget increases than hospitals, five years after ministers pledged to create “parity …

Salvage Operation | Made In Stoke-on-Trent

In the bowels of an old pottery factory, a group of determined men eke out a profit from stripping down and recycling electrical waste. All of them have some form of mental health condition or disability. It’s a tough business, …

Common birth control shot linked to risk of HIV infection

WASHINGTON--Transitioning away from a popular contraceptive shot known as DMPA could help protect women in Sub-Saharan Africa and other high-risk regions from becoming infected with HIV, according to a research review published in the Endocrine Society's journal...

New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals

Faced with climate change today, companies and investors face many complex ethical questions. Should investors continue to invest in fossil fuels or should they divest, sending a signal about the perceived illegitimacy of particular business models in a changing...

MSU studies investigate effectiveness of booster seats

BOZEMAN -- Booster seats, car seats and seat belts are equally effective at saving the lives of children, while booster seats top the others at reducing minor injuries specifically among children ages 8-12, according to Montana State University economist D. Mark...

Place of residence linked to heart failure risk

Location. Location. Location. When buying and selling real estate, the phrase is a realtor's mantra. It is also the central theme of a recently released journal report on factors that can predict heart failure risk. According to new research in the American Heart...

Digital technology is helping women to explore their sexuality

Women who consume Internet pornography are using technology to explore their sexuality and connect with others to discuss their sexual interests, according to research from the University of Waterloo. The qualitative study involved in-depth discussions with 28 women...

Robotic weeders: to a farm near you?

The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot. The growing popularity of robotic weeders for specialty crops has grown partly out of necessity, says Steven Fennimore, an extension specialist at the University of California, Davis. Specialty crops...

Expert unlocks mechanics of how snakes move in a straight line

Snakes are known for their iconic S-shaped movements. But they have a less noticeable skill that gives them a unique superpower. Snakes can crawl in a straight line. University of Cincinnati biologist Bruce Jayne studied the mechanics of snake movement to understand...

Can Math Predict What You Will Do Next?

Summary: Researchers consider how math and machine learning can help predict human behavior.

Source: The Conversation.

Good scientists are not only able to uncover patterns in the things they study, but to use this information to predict the future.

Meteorologists

Researchers Make Cells That Enable to Sense of Touch

Summary: UCLA researchers have successfully transformed human stem cells into sensory interneurons.

Source: UCLA.

Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells

Discovery could lead to new treatment for anxiety, addiction

New research provides fresh insight into how the brain processes reward and punishment, opening new avenues for developing treatment of conditions ranging from anxiety to addictive behaviors such as drug abuse. The study, published in the journal eLife, used a rodent...

Uneven growth in US medical and health R&D investments across sectors

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Nov. 10, 2017 -- Total U.S. investment in medical and health R&D in the U.S. grew by 20.6% from 2013 to 2016 led by industry and the federal government, according to U.S. Investments in Medical and Health Research and Development, a new report from...

New care model closes significant gap in addiction treatment

(Boston) - A new program at Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction is showing that connecting patients to addiction treatment when they are hospitalized for other conditions can be a powerful tool in closing a gap in addiction treatment. In fact, early...

Head injury does not worsen drinking behavior in heavy drinkers

Philadelphia, PA, November 15, 2017 - Head injury, which often damages brain regions overlapping with those involved in addictive behaviors, does not worsen drinking behavior in people with heavy alcohol use, according to a new study published in Biological...

Using social media big data to combat prescription drug crisis

Researchers at Dartmouth, Stanford University, and IBM Research, conducted a critical review of existing literature to determine whether social media big data can be used to understand communication and behavioral patterns related to prescription drug abuse. Their...

Cultural values can be a strong predictor of alcohol consumption

Countries with populations that value autonomy and harmony tend to have higher average levels of alcohol consumption than countries with more traditional values, such as hierarchy and being part of a collective. This new research finding, published today in...

Smoking study personalizes treatment

A simple blood test is allowing Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers to determine which patients should be prescribed varenicline (Chantix) to stop smoking and which patients could do just as well, and avoid side effects, by using a nicotine patch....

Now you like it, now you don’t

Enjoyment of music is considered a subjective experience; what one person finds gratifying, another may find irritating. Music theorists have long emphasized that although musical taste is relative, our enjoyment of music, be it classical or heavy metal, arises, among...

Baby-boomers and millennials more afflicted by the opioid epidemic

Baby-boomers, those born between 1947 and 1964, experienced an excess risk of prescription opioid overdose death and heroin overdose death, according to latest research at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Individuals born between 1979 and 1992...

Emergency radiologists see inner toll of opioid use disorders

CHICAGO - Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opioid use disorders, according to results from a 12-year study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)....

Smartphone addiction creates imbalance in brain

CHICAGO - Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). According to a recent Pew...

Cannabis linked to bipolar symptoms in young adults

Adolescent cannabis use is an independent risk factor for future hypomania - often experienced as part of bipolar disorder - finds new research led by University of Warwick First research to robustly test the association between adolescent cannabis use and hypomania...

Mental health disorder therapeutic modalities modified for the GMS

Mental health disorders can affect physical and psychological behaviors. The people of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) have a high risk of mental health disorders, such as depression, stress, and substance abuse because the people in this region are sometimes...

Four-fold jump in deaths in opioid-driven hospitalizations

People who end up in the hospital due to an opioid-related condition are four times more likely to die now than they were in 2000, according to research led by Harvard Medical School and published in the December issue of Health Affairs. The country is in the throes...

Parental attention can reduce risk of drug abuse in adolescence

Parents who require children to follow rules and keep a constant eye on their activities, endeavoring to know where they are, who they are with and what they are doing, run less risk of facing problems when their children enter adolescence, such as abuse of alcohol...

Safer opioid drugs could treat pain and save lives

Opioid drugs are the most widely prescribed and effective type of pain medication. But they are highly addictive and have some unpleasant and potentially deadly side effects. Now a group of researchers, led by Dr. Laura Bohn at The Scripps Research Institute, may have...

Research finds new ways to fight the opioid crisis

In the US alone, more than 2 million people struggle with opioid use disorders. Opioids, often prescribed as pain medications, have now become the country's leading cause of drug overdose. But scientists are identifying ways to help combat the epidemic, which include...

Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens

Chronic sleep deprivation--which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school--has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night. But this social jet lag poses some...

New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids

As the opioid crisis continues to escalate, the number of people who need treatment for their dependency on heroin or prescription pain killers far exceeds the capacity of available treatment programs. People seeking treatment can wait months or even years for spots...

Dangers of commonly prescribed painkillers highlighted in study

Commonly prescribed painkillers need to be given for shorter periods of time to reduce the risk of obesity and sleep deprivation, a new study has revealed. Over the past 10 years, there has been a large increase in the prescription of medications such as opioids and...

Study finds recreational drug users not what we think

A reasearcher from James Cook University in Queensland has been investigating why Australians are among the top users of illegal drugs in the world - and has uncovered some revealing new facts about the motivations of recreational drug users. Professor David Plummer...

Breath test could be possible for drugs and disease

Testing for drug use and disease in humans could soon be much simpler, thanks to new Swedish research. Whereas drug tests currently rely on blood or urine samples, researchers from the University of Gothenburg have identified a method for drug testing by analysing...

Brain scans may reveal most effective anti-drug messages

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- What if you could look into the brains of potential drug abusers and see what messages would be most likely to persuade them to "just say no?" That's the ultimate goal of researchers whose new study scanned the brains of people while they watched...

Children bear the brunt of secondhand smoke in Bangladesh

Researchers say there is an urgent need for action after 95 per cent of children from 12 primary schools in Dhaka tested positive for recent second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure. The study, which involved collaboration with the University of Dhaka, is the first to report...

Managing concerning behaviors when opioids are taken for chronic pain

PITTSBURGH, Dec. 11, 2017 - Patients receiving long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain sometimes demonstrate challenging and concerning behaviors, such as using more opioid medication than prescribed or concomitant alcohol or drug use. A new study, published in the...

Alcohol taxes are too low, have not kept up with inflation

PISCATAWAY, NJ - State alcohol excise taxes are typically only a few cents per drink and have not kept pace with inflation, according to a new study in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. Raising those taxes, according to the authors,...

Vaping popular among teens; opioid misuse at historic lows

Nearly one in three 12th graders report past year use of some kind of vaping device, raising concerns about the impact on their health. What they say is in the device, however, ranges from nicotine, to marijuana, to "just flavoring." The survey also suggests that use...

Cigarette smoking is increasing among Americans with drug problems

While cigarette smoking has declined in the U.S. for the past several decades, since 2002 the prevalence of smoking has increased significantly among people with an illicit substance use disorder, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University's...

Running away from addiction: How exercise aids smoking cessation

New research in mice sheds light on the mechanism underlining exercise's protective effect against nicotine dependence and withdrawal. The British Journal of Pharmacology study reveals that exercise during nicotine exposure markedly reduces the severity of nicotine...

Study: Medications alone don’t help smokers quit

Pharmaceutical interventions are routinely prescribed to help people quit smoking. However, a new study by University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers suggests that, despite promising results in clinical trials, smoking cessation drugs alone may...

Can e-cigarettes help smokers quit?

As e-cigarettes become more popular, fewer people are taking up smoking traditional cigarettes. But can e-cigarettes, an electronic nicotine delivery system, help people quit smoking altogether? That was the focus of a recent study led by a Hollings Cancer Center...

January/February 2018 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet

Patients Who Receive Prescription Opioids are More Satisfied With Care Than Other Patients Patients with musculoskeletal conditions who receive prescription opioids are more satisfied with their care than comparable patients who do not receive opioids. In a study of...

At least 3 out of 5 people who try a cigarette become daily smokers

At least 61 per cent of people who try their first cigarette become, at least temporarily, daily smokers, suggests an analysis of survey data by Queen Mary University of London. The findings, from over 215,000 survey respondents and published in the journal Nicotine &...

Intoxicatingly light sensitive

When many people hear the abbreviation THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), they immediately think of smoking marijuana and intoxication. But the substance is also of interest to medicine - when given to people suffering from serious illnesses, it relieves muscle cramps, pain,...

Stigma continues to hamper response to opioid epidemic

Efforts to reverse the nation's opioid epidemic remain beset by the stigma associated with drug use, a group of OHSU researchers write in a year-end review. The stigma continues despite the fact that more than one-third of the American population used prescription...

Teenagers gamble away their education

The odds are stacked against teenagers who regularly gamble. A new study in Springer's Journal of Gambling Studies shows that a 14-year-old who gambles is more likely to struggle at school. The study was led by Frank Vitaro of the University of Montreal,...

Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking

Quitting smoking is among the top New Year's resolutions, but is notoriously difficult to do and often requires multiple attempts and strategies. A growing body of research points to using a harm minimization approach for smoking cessation. Harm minimization...

Immune System Activation in Newborns May Affect Developing Brain

Summary: Immune system activation that occurs as result of infection shortly after birth can cause persistent sleep pattern changes and neurodevelopmental disorders, a new study reveals.

Source: McLean Hospital.

McLean Hospital neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of

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