Gay activist claims she was spiritually abused by evangelical churches

Jayne Ozanne to warn C of E general synod over high rate of suicide, depression and self-harm among LGBTI Christians

A leading gay activist in the Church of England who says she endured “spiritual abuse” because of her sexuality is urging the church to ensure the safety of LGBTI Christians.

Jayne Ozanne, whose experience in a charismatic evangelical church led to a breakdown, has warned that the high rate of suicide, self-harm and depression among LGBTI Christians will continue unabated unless spiritual abuse is tackled.

Related: Most C of E bishops scared to publicly back gay clergy, says vicar

Related: Church of England in turmoil as synod rejects report on same-sex relationships

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Grenfell wasn’t an isolated tragedy. Poverty destroys many lives in Britain | Kamran Ahmed

Working as a junior psychiatrist, I saw first-hand how policies that fail to protect the disadvantaged lead to ill-health, stress and reduced life expectancy

A tragedy as gut-wrenching as Grenfell Tower has scarcely been seen during peace time in the UK. The negligence and cruelty of the decisions that caused it have sparked justifiable outrage. Concerns raised by residents were ignored and there are allegations that dangerous materials were used to cut costs and make the building look nice for the rich folk. People understandably take to the streets to protest and seek justice.

Related: The Grenfell Tower tragedy should see off austerity. But don’t hold your breath | Patrick Butler

Poverty is a cause and consequence of accidents and ill-health

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For students, the Queen’s speech should be a call to action | Malia Bouattia

On mental health, EU citizens’ rights and counter-extremism, there is an opportunity for student campaigners to make a real difference

The Queen’s speech was a dream come true for no one – except perhaps foxes, who will be relieved that there was no further mention of hunting. But for students, it was a mixed bag.

The speech was light on detail and heavy on Brexit. For the 84% of voting students who were opposed to leaving the EU, the future it outlined is exactly what we didn’t want. But there were silver linings: the announcement of plans to abolish letting agent fees and to bring forward legislation protecting victims of domestic violence, for instance. There are also plans to tackle the gender pay gap.

Related: NUS president Malia Bouattia: ‘Political activists are being demonised’

Related: Three steps to building a successful student campaign

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NHS and police failings led to brutal murder of grandmother – report

Nicola Edgington, who had previously murdered her own mother, killed Sally Hodkin after series of failings

A series of failings by the NHS and police led to a psychiatric patient brutally murdering a grandmother, a report has concluded.

Nicola Edgington almost decapitated Sally Hodkin, 58, with a butcher’s knife in Bexleyheath, south-east London, in 2011, six years after killing her own mother.

Related: Police ‘missed chance to carry out checks on woman who went on to kill’

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What I wish I could tell my boss: ‘You saved my life when I was suicidal’

The teacher: I am now a manager myself, and I never forget that a boss has the ability to change lives

To say I was feeling low would be an understatement. A dramatic and unforeseen turn of events transformed my happy life into a trauma overnight. Depression felt like my life was crumbling, the ground ripped from beneath my feet.

In desperate need for stability I threw myself into work with a new-found intensity. I was often the first to arrive in the morning and the last to leave at night. Work gave me purpose, but my sense of self became entwined in work – perhaps it wasn’t healthy, but pride in my work boosted my sense of worth and esteem.

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Why I won’t be the Lib Dems’ next leader | Norman Lamb

Some voices in the party say I want a hard Brexit. I don’t – what I want is an end to the gross inequality that has made me angrier than ever

Liberal Democrats are faced with electing a new leader after Tim Farron’s resignation last week. I have come to the conclusion that I will not be putting myself forward as a candidate for that vacancy. That might seem strange given the support and encouragement I have received from party members – indeed, from many people outside the Lib Dems.

Related: Tim Farron quits as Lib Dem leader

Related: Shunting people with mental illness across the country is utterly inhumane

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My friend’s suicide, bureaucracy and cuts: why I quit as an NHS manager

I was driven to the brink by the poor care my friend received. I finally left over pointless tasks

The first time I thought I should leave the NHS and never return was at my friend’s inquest. After struggling with mental health issues for many years he had taken his own life. At his inquest, I learnt that in the period leading up to his suicide his mental health appointments had all been with support workers and he had not once seen a qualified mental health nurse. I also discovered that his last five appointments had been with four different members of staff. The coroner asked about the level of the service he had received. The manager of the service cited difficulties with a large geographical patch and described the service he received as usual practice. As an NHS manager myself, I could see it may have been usual practice, but it was far from good enough.

As I drove home from the inquest my head was spinning with dissonant thoughts and questions. I was angry and upset. I was concerned for the service manager. I was furious with government cuts. I was worrying about the service I managed. I needed the noise in my head to stop. I found myself contemplating killing myself. I did not sleep that night. I knew I was unwell and so the next day I saw my GP. I needed three months off work for severe depression and anxiety. I had excellent talking therapy via my GP surgery and my counsellor continued to support me through and beyond my return to work.

Related: The NHS sets leaders up to fail – and then recruits more in the same mould

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Ant McPartlin has no reason to apologise. His addiction is not his fault | Chris Owen

The TV star says he feels he’s let people down. But after spending time in rehab I know how important it is that addiction is seen as an illness, not as self-inflicted

The weekend brought the news that Ant McPartlin, one half of Ant and Dec – PJ of PJ and Duncan fame – has checked into rehab for addiction problems with alcohol and drugs. He’s to spend a couple of months in recovery, where – hopefully – he’ll come out armed with the knowledge of how he became unwell in the first place, and how he can keep himself safe and sober in the long term.

Related: Ant McPartlin speaks out about depression and addiction

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As a psychologist for NHS staff I saw how hospital work takes its toll

I was struck by their terrible experiences – the doctor who kept seeing a dead child and the person with an alcohol problem

When I began working as a psychologist at a large London teaching hospital I was fascinated and – a little overwhelmed – by the challenge of developing a new psychology service. I was employed solely for the 5,000 staff working in the hospital. Absolutely anyone could come and see me for psychological support, from the porters to the medical consultants. And they did. Over a 12-year period I saw many NHS staff.

Sometimes they were sent by managers who were worried about them. About their behaviour or their distress or the impact of a very traumatic event they had witnessed, for example. Others referred themselves in secret and hoped that no one would know they were coming. When they left they were always polite and thanked me but usually said that they hoped they would never see me again.

It sometimes felt like there was hope that staff could disappear for a bit and emerge intact and ready to work

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Number of under-18s on antidepressants in England rises by 12%

Data shows over 166,000 were given such medication between April 2015 and June 2016, including 537 aged six or under

Tens of thousands of young people in England, including children as young as six, are being prescribed antidepressants by their doctors. The figures have prompted concern that medics may be overprescribing strong medication because of stretched and underfunded mental health services.

Data obtained by the Guardian shows that 166,510 under-18s, including 10,595 seven-to-12-year-olds and 537 aged six or younger, were given medication typically used to treat depression and anxiety between April 2015 and June 2016. The figures, released by NHS England under the Freedom of Information Act, show a 12% rise in the numbers taking the drugs over the same time period.

Related: Antidepressants prescribed far more in deprived English coastal towns

Related: Antidepressant prescriptions in England double in a decade

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Ant McPartlin speaks out about his depression and addiction

Presenter has reportedly entered rehab for treatment for anxiety and prescription drug and alcohol abuse

Ant McPartlin has said he feels he has let people down as he reportedly enters rehab following a battle with depression, alcohol and substance abuse.

The TV presenter, one half of the duo Ant and Dec, said he wanted to speak out about his issues in order to help others.

Very brave Ant to go public. This is the first stage of the road to recovery. All the best Ant it, will all be sorted for sure @antanddec https://t.co/lDcg5SjttD

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Exam stress rising? No, pupils are just better at seeking help | Laura McInerney

Of course sitting GCSEs can be a trying experience, but with good support, study pressure can be positive

Across the country at the moment, young people are engaging in a practice that will give them nightmares for decades. Nope, not fidget spinners or Snapchat filters: those give only adults nightmares. The real answer is exams.

It’s almost 20 years since my maths GCSE and yet the bad dreams are still the same. No revision done, the exam hall lost in a labyrinth of corridors, the start already missed. I am not alone. Exam anxiety dreams are among the most common in adults. Is it these painful associations, then, that mean a quarter of British parents report their mental health was negatively affected by having children who are currently taking exams? Or is it, as the parents will more often tell you, because watching your child break under the pressure is enough to make anyone sick?

Related: GCSEs and A-levels: how are young people coping with exam stress?

Among boys, the number experiencing any psychological distress has actually gone down

Related: Six tactics to help your students deal with stress

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The rise of eSports: are addiction and corruption the price of its success?

Forget football, the world’s fastest-growing sport is live video gaming. But increasingly its impact is proving harmful to those involved

If you had been away from the planet for the past quarter of a century, one of the few things you might find comfortingly familiar on your return is the world of sport. While the digital revolution has transformed the way we shop, chat, date, do politics and consume culture, sport looks largely unchanged. From football to cricket to golf, it’s still the same old staples, hitting a ball into a hole or goal or over a boundary. There hasn’t been a major new sport invented for more than a century. Or has there?

In the East End of London, Sam Mathews is holding court at Fnatic’s HQ, otherwise known as the Bunkr. A pop-up shop that opened last December, it is marketed as the “world’s first eSports concept store” and is as knowingly hip as its Shoreditch surroundings. Here at the Bunkr, you can buy eSports equipment, meet players, view streamed events and even watch matches live.

Related: Hashtag United, Wimbly Womblys and the virtual gamers striking it rich

Related: Sport 2.0: crumbling traditions create a whole new ballgame | Sean Ingle

Related: Sebastian Coe: ‘Athletics needs to be innovative, braver and more creative’

Related: Golf fights old perceptions and drop in players to attract new audience | Ewan Murray

I ask if he will give me the most powerful shock he gives patients. The impact is violent. I still feel it hours later

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How to take a guilt-free holiday as a freelancer

Working for yourself means taking time off is not as simple as turning an out-of-office response on

I know the exact moment on my recent holiday where I finally relaxed after months of overdoing it. Towards the end of a trip to the US, my friend and I spent an afternoon of trashy pleasure on the Warner Bros studio tour in Los Angeles.

After winding through film sets, our tour cart stopped outside a building that housed props from the Harry Potter movies. I’m not a Potter addict, but I found myself staring into a glass case filled with magic wands. Without realising, I gasped in a moment of unthinking awe. After months of staring at a computer screen, my brain had finally unclenched.

Taking time away means turning down opportunities. Unless you’re being offered a career-defining gig, try to say no

Related: Wanderlust: five ways to keep your job while travelling the world

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Women abused by partners suffer lifelong health problems – study

First long-term Australian study to investigate impacts of intimate partner violence finds those who have survived abuse ‘recorded significantly poorer health’

Women who are abused by their partner suffer significant physical and mental health problems that persist throughout their lifetime, the first long-term Australian study to investigate the health impacts of intimate partner violence has found.

The research, led by the University of Newcastle’s research centre for generational health and ageing, followed 16,761 participants from the Women’s Health Australia study for 16 years from 1996.

Related: Domestic violence: five women tell their stories of leaving – the most dangerous time

Related: When I first wrote about domestic violence, no one talked about it. Now the shame has lifted

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